About this Show

ABC World News With Diane Sawyer

News/Business. Diane Sawyer. (2012) New. (CC)

NETWORK
ABC

DURATION
00:30:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel 74 (525 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1280

PIXEL HEIGHT
720

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Sears 12, Abc 10, America 8, Us 7, Diane 5, Advair 4, California 4, Romney 4, China 4, Benghazi 4, U.s. 3, Israel 3, Graham 3, Jonathan Karl 2, Dan 2, David Muir 2, Levemir 2, Kentucky 2, Washington 2, Nancy Pelosi 2,
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  ABC    ABC World News With Diane Sawyer    News/Business. Diane  
   Sawyer.  (2012) New. (CC)  

    November 14, 2012
    5:30 - 6:00pm PST  

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the re-elected president weighs in on your taxes, the petraeus scandal and issues a blazing challenge to those criticizing his u.n. ambassador on benghazi. >> you want to go after somebody, they should go after me. romney's revelation. what he said today about blacks, hispanics and why he thinks obama really won. made in america. would a big corporate giant like sears take your idea and have it made in china? this small town inventor says yes and tries to take them on. and fakeout. what is he doing? was he really pushed? how about him? the crackdown tonight. good evening. we begin with the president. eight days after his re-election energized and diving straight into the headlines.
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at his first press conference today, he talked about the scandal that took down the head of the cia, the looming fiscal crisis that could raise taxes for everyone on january 1st and then, he came out swinging in defense of one member of his team. and abc's jonathan karl was right there in that room asking questions. jon? >> reporter: diane, this was a confident president today, eager to lay out his agenda for the coming months, but first, he had to face questions on that scandal that has shaken his national security team. in his first comments on the sex scandal that brought down his cia director, the president said petraeus failed to meet his own standards, but he also praised him. >> we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. and my main hope right now is that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> reporter: he also addressed the central question. did the scandal put national security at risk?
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>> i have no evidence at this point, from what i've seen, that classified information was disclosed that in any way would have had an impact on our national security. >> reporter: on those high stakes talks over the looming budget crisis, the president took a hard line on his bottom line. any deficit deal must include tax increases on the wealthy. >> more voters agreed with me on this issue than voted for me. so, we've got a clear majority of the american people who recognize if we're going to be serious about deficit reduction, we've got to do it in a balanced way. >> reporter: there was a real flash of presidential anger on the topic of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. earlier today, republicans john mccain and lindsey graham lashed out at susan rice, the leading candidate to replace secretary of state hillary clinton, because she initially suggested the attack began as a protest. >> why would susan rice not get our vote? i don't trust her.
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>> reporter: we put that to the president. senator graham said he simply doesn't trust ambassador rice after what she said about benghazi. >> if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador, who had nothing to do with benghazi and to besmirch her reputation is outray outrageous. >> reporter: in a blistering response to that, senator graham issued a statement a short while ago, directly to the president, saying, quote, don't think for one minute that i don't hold you responsible. i think you failed as a commander in chief before, during and after the attack. in other words, diane, this battle is just beginning. >> first new battle of this re-elected term. thank you, jonathan karl. and you heard the president mention general petraeus, engulfed in that scandal. we have a new picture tonight of paula broadwell. his biographer, standing in front of the window with cameras parked outside. it was at her brother's home in
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washington, d.c. and abc news has learned she is being investigated for storing classified documents on her computer and in her home. and just tonight, the army has suspended her security clearance. and now, we move onto presidential candidate mitt romney, revealing how he feels about the obama voters and the obama victory. he was talking to his big donors today and abc's david muir is here with what he said. and david, you learned he was saying this right after the defeat. >> reporter: yeah, this argument began, diane, in the hours of after the loss. he started offering reasons for his loss, the very next morning, arguing america is becoming an entitled society. but today, in a recorded call to donors, he said, giving away free tough is a hard thing to compete with. mitt romney leaving his hotel the day after the election, next to the convention center where he'd hoped to deliver the one speech he'd written, his victory speech. but now, in the week since the election, abc news has learned mitt romney has been explaining his loss to his closest advisers and his top donors. and it started at a breakfast
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the very next morning. now today, perhaps his most eye-opening explanations yet, during a conference call with a large group of donors. romney arguing that president obama won in part because of gifts the obama administration had given to particular groups in this country. >> what the president's campaign did was focus on certain members of his base coalition. give them extraordinary financial gifts from the government. and then work very aggressively to turn them out to vote. >> reporter: among those groups the gifts went to, romney discusses the african-american community, young people and the hispanic community. here, offering one of the gifts to them. >> what the president did is, he gave them two things. one, he gave them a big gift on immigration, with the d.r.e.a.m. act and amnesty program. >> reporter: and the second thing, in order to get hispanic voters? >> number two, put in place obama care, which basically is $10,000 a family. i mean, it's a proven political
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strategy, which is give a bunch of money from the government to a group and, guess what? they'll vote for you. >> reporter: sources tell me this has been romney's argument since the moment he realized he'd lost. telling his closest circle the very next morning that america is becoming an entitled society. that some americans are asking for government to solve problems for things they can't afford. >> the giving away free stuff is a hard thing to compete with. >> reporter: and just when you thought this election was behind us, a tweet from david axelrod, the top obama strategist, saying, "still looking at america through that 47% prism. mitt tells donors the takers did him in." and diane, we learned that romney talked to bill clinton after the election. he said on that call today that clinton told him, "i thought you were going to win, then the hurricane happened." romney using the hurricane in his discussions, too, as his reasons why. >> okay, david, thank you. this is late breaking news, i know you'll be back with made in america in just a moment. but now we will go overseas to the tension rising between israelis and the palestinians today, because israel killed the
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military leader of the palestinian militant group hamas, in an air strike. look. this is the car in gaza, carrying the hamas commander as an israeli rocket hits it. israel said this was retaliation for rockets fired by palestinian militants. overall, israel hitting 20 targets. it's being called the most serious escalation in violence there in four years. and back here at home, a very big drama today, about the meningitis outbreak. the man who owns that drug factory, contaminated by fungus, came to be grilled on capitol hill. and in the same room, the families of those who died, giving gripping testimony, saying, it is a nightmare that will not end. here's abc's david kerley. >> reporter: the man whose company produced drugs that sickened and killed so many -- >> anything you can say to them? >> reporter: ran a gauntlet of reporters. >> why not? >> reporter: he said nothing
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about his pharmacy that made drugs for debilitating back pain. the conditions were deplorable. dirty floors, clean rooms with mold or bacterial growth. the steroids produced here infected eddie lovelace with meningitis and killed him. >> we're heartbroken. we're devastated. and i've just come here begging you to do something about this matter. >> reporter: a question members of congress put to that owner. >> what explanation can you give the families who have lost their loved ones -- >> on advice of council -- >> reporter: five times, he took the fifth. >> i respectfully decline. i respectfully decline. i respectfully decline to answer on the basis of my constitutional rights and privileges. >> reporter: refusing to answer any questions. >> is your position that the fda could not have prevented this tragedy because you did not have jurisdiction? is that what you're telling me today? >> we have unclear, fragmented legal regulatory framework. >> reporter: so, what will happen to the owner? he could face jail time.
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as for the 14,000 people injected with the drugs, they're being told to be on the lookout for a couple more months, but finally, tomorrow marks six weeks since the recall, when most probably would have shown symptoms of the deadly side effect. david kerley, abc news, washington. and now, as promised, we turn to made in america, and david muir will be back, getting answers right now. as we know, every $64 spent on american-made goods can create 200,000 jobs. but could a corporate giant take your idea and have it made in china? one american inventor says it happened to him. >> reporter: the small town of cabot, pennsylvania. proudly flying their american flags. >> last year was a great year. >> reporter: proudly making their american invention. you were determined to make it in america? >> yes, that was my goal from day one. >> reporter: dan brown invented the bionic wrench. what he thought was a genius solution to that problem we've all had -- stripped bolts. >> pliers and adjustable wrenches can strip the corners.
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but that won't stop the bionic. >> reporter: his invention grabs onto the bolt from six sides at once. >> the bionic wrench engages all six flat sides of the bolt with symmetrical pressure. >> reporter: this time last year, this factory was buzzing. >> sears had us stocked in all the stores. >> reporter: the holiday ads were on tv. and sears was their biggest seller. >> for only $19.99 at sears. >> reporter: dan said sears was so into his invention, they asked him not to sell at some of their biggest competitors. like home depot or lowe's. >> yes. >> reporter: so you said that's a deal. >> yes. >> reporter: dan says they sold more than 200,000 wrenches with sears last christmas. they kept doing business this year. then suddenly, he says, no deal for this christmas. they've had to lay off 30 workers. did you wonder what was going on? >> oh, of course we did. >> reporter: but then dan heard from a customer who noticed something. telling him there was now another wrench, with what appeared to be a similar mechanism on the shelf at sears, but this one, made in china. and sold under the sears brand, craftsman. in fact, side by side, listen to the old ad --
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>> because it grips on all six sides. >> reporter: now the one for the new wrench. >> the six locking jaws. >> reporter: or this part of the pitch. before. >> it's 14 wrenches in one. >> reporter: and now the craftsman wrench. >> it replaces 14 wrenches with a single tool. >> reporter: what did you think when you saw it? >> it's a knockoff. there's no question. if you take them apart and you look at these plates, they're virtually the same. >> reporter: dan has filed suit, claiming sears stole his idea. tonight, sears arguing, not so fast. saying they didn't steal anything. e-mailing us this statement. "the allegations made by mr. brown simply are untrue." they go on to write, "despite some visual similarities, the craftsman axess locking wrench on rates in a different way, using a mechanism designed in the 1950s." what do you say to sears when they say this is not the same wrench? >> ah, they're lying. that's what i say. they're lying. >> reporter: dan argues, small town american inventors rarely have the means to fight back. it can cost up to $50,000 just to get that original patent. don swaney on the assembly line, one of the few workers left, watching those 30 coworkers leave.
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>> all the jobs are going over to china. that's the way it is. >> it just tears me apart. i mean, what more can we do? if we don't stop this, we'll have no jobs left. >> reporter: our team did go out and buy both wrenches today, both the same price. the before and now the new one here. and while that american inventor argues the tools have the same mechanism, whether it's a rip-off or not will be up to the courts to decide now. that inventor, diane, arguing american jobs are in the balance. and sears telling us tonight, we have 264,000 workers, sears believes in america. >> you'll let us know what happens next? >> reporter: will do. >> thank you, david. and still ahead here on "world news," imagine having to deal with this every day. flight attendants saying, "enough." and tonight, we'll tell you their strategy for thanksgiving travel survival. [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth.
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>> if you have [ bleep ], this is your time. >> reporter: this american eagle flight attendant roughly inviting passengers to, how do they say it, deplane? the infamous jet blue flight attendant steven slater, who grabbed a beer from the galley. >> are you going to lose your job? >> more than likely. >> reporter: and bolted through the emergency exit at new york's jfk. >> we just had a slide deployment. it was intentionally deployed. >> the job has become more stressful, because when passengers get on, they're already stressed. >> reporter: sheila dail is a veteran us airways flight attendant. she suffered her own traumatic and incredibly stressful day back in 2009, aboard the miracle on the hudson flight that crash landed in the river. >> there was a shudder. a few minutes later, we heard, "this is the captain. brace for impact." >> reporter: unable to sleep for days, and with no one to talk to, dail wished she had someone to call, which drove her to set up a new peer to peer hotline, using 46 volunteers in its second year, to answer flight attendant crisis calls at all hours.
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>> we help people deal with death on board, serious illness on board. security issues, weather issues, turbulence. >> reporter: the association of flight attendants says incident reports show stress comes from passengers too, "demanding drinks and cussing," another "did some karate moves then rushed at her with his hands out in a choking way." susan gilliam became part of the crisis team after an emergency landing made her afraid to fly. >> sometimes i would just turn around and go right back home and say it wasn't meant to be. i used all my sick time. >> reporter: aviation jobs are some of the most stressful in business today. and now flight attendants are learning to comfort each other as they try to prevent anymore mid-air freakouts. jim avila, abc news, philadelphia. and coming up here, don't mess with this woman. what did nancy pelosi say when asked by a young reporter if at her age, she should get out of
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symbolizes a person's inner lite. and the power of that light to protect you from spiritual darkness. and a quote in the news tonight. "i have all the time in the world." that's what a shot bi's auction near said to an anonymous buyer of a painting. he was waiting and it paid off. this masterpiece sold for a cool $75 million. the expert thought it would bring less. $50 million. patience, as they say, can be a very money-making virtue. and our person in the news tonight, watch out, if it's nancy pelosi. she announced today she wants to stay on as house minority leader. and then one question stunned everyone in the room. she was asked if a leader who is 72 years old is blocking younger leaders from their turn. >> next. next. let's for a moment honor it as a
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legitimate question. although it's quite offensive but you don't realize that, i guess. >> she defended her record of helping younger members of congress, particularly women, she said, get elected and find a foothold on capitol hill. and, we always want to hear from you. which pictures, people, quotes, captured your imagination every day? tell us online at abcnews.com or tweet me, @dianesawyer. and, coming up, do you think this athlete was faking his fall? or was he really pushed down? is this cheating? new and surprising video coming in tonight. [ male announcer ] humana and walmart have teamed up to bring you a low-priced medicare prescription drug plan. ♪ with a low national plan premium... ♪ ...and copays as low as one dollar... ♪ ...saving on your medicare prescriptions is easy. ♪ so you're free to focus on the things
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and finally tonight, you've seen pictures of athletes pretending to be knocked down on the court. did you see what happened last night, university of kentucky versus duke? it is something called flopping, which is a kind of faking, notorious in pro games. and the nba is cracking down. abc's nick watt. >> offensive foul. >> reporter: kentucky's coach just basically accused duke of cheating, with theatrical reactions to the slightest contact. >> they're flopping all over the place. in the nba, they'd all be suspended. >> reporter: well, not quite, but this season in the pros, for the first time, they are punishing bad acting. >> that's a flop. >> reporter: like lebron's tumble against the pacers in the playoffs last season? i mean, it's a bad example for the kids in the stands, right? are you glad they're going to clamp down on the floppers this year? >> yeah, yeah get that out of here. >> reporter: no place in the game? yeah, that's whack.
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>> reporter: david sloan of the cavaliers just drew one of the first official warnings for this, named and shamed on the nba website. further offenses draw fines up to $30,000. a bigger punishment, perhaps, there's also an instructional video. >> this was an illegitimate basketball play by number 30 in the white uniform. again, this flop will be penalized. >> flopping almost doesn't do it justice. trickery. deceit. >> when i first came into the league, nobody flopped. >> reporter: but they've learned from the likes of soccer. watch this guy. using an opponent's had to punch himself in the face, when ecuador played chile last year. you guys have worked for this your whole life, you have a god-given talent, you get to the nba and you fall over. >> yeah, yeah, some guys do it better than others. >> reporter: can you name names for us? >> no, i would never do that. >> reporter: okay, i will. sorry, chris bosh. the heat versus the bulls, february last year. flop. >> i don't even think he hit him. you got the academy awards coming up. >> reporter: nick watt, abc
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news, los angeles. and we thank you for watching. we are always here at abcnews.com. "nightline," of course, will be along later. and i'll see you right back here again tomorrow night. until then, have a great night. good night. tonight california pollution credits go up for bid a tempts to fight global warming or a tax that will wipe out jobs? >> it's a race against the clock in a mud ravaged neighborhood of daily city. they're shoring up the hillside. >> we're live in san francisco where they're having problems getting power back on. following a fire that has been out for hours. >> in lake ta show, some of the slopes are open.
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i'll show you what it's like coming up. >> if california controversial contribution to the fight against climate change. business that's can't meet the state new cap on pollution can now trade with those that can. good evening, i'm dan ashley. >> the goal to reduce global warming but the program could translate to big money for cash-strapped california. abc 7 news has the story to sacramento. >> in an ebay like auction, california took kids bidz for pollution credits for oil refineries. under the legislation, credits from this program allow businesses to emit a certain amount of green house gases. it could net